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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 195 (some duplicates have been removed)
it to light was found dead in his home. rebecca brooks was arrested this weekend after resigning as ceo of news corp. she is expected to testify tomorrow. this is not her first time appearing before parliament, the clip i'm showing you is from 2003. watch closely. brooks testifying with andy coulson. coulson went on to become david cameron's spokesman and has since resigned and has been arrested in the scandal. >> can i ask, the one element if you ever pay the bliss for information? >> we have paid police for information in the past, and it's been -- >> will you do it in the put? >> it depends on -- >> within the code and within the law, there is a clear public interest and the same holds for private detectives, subterfuge. >> it's illegal for police officers to receive payments. >> no, no, no. i just said within the law. >> this is not only the beginning of the scandal. it's the beginning of the news corporation's attempts at damage control. coulson stepping in to blunt brooks' answers. i spoke with the other british whistleblower about the death of sean hoare and about the spread of a
. they will discuss questions over the phone hacking scandal. rupert murdoch, his son james, rebekah brooks prepare for questions. >> also coming up on the program, the shuttle atlantis departs the international space station for the very last time. also from the comic book to the stage, that man makes a theatrical debut. -- batman makes a theatrical debut/ . ♪ ♪ >> welcome to the houses of parliament, the mother of all parliament. will it be the mother of all battles today between the mp's and the murdochs. it has been tailing weeks of political crisis that has taken the politics and the police. many journalists and camera crews hurt joining here behind me. we are waiting -- are joining here behind me. we are waiting for questioning of the people. we will bring you the live updates here. the house of commons media and committee is made up of a cross parsee of selection from members of parliament. they will begin by questioning the news corp. chief rupert murdoch and his son james. it will ask the former chief executive rebekah brooks to give testimony. they want to find out how much they knew
-news international chief rebekah brooks will prepare to face british legislators. >>> two giants of tech as ibm powers ahead but cisco loses its way. >>> and banks lead the losses as debt ditherring continues to drag the world stock markets. >>> rupert murdoch's power and influence will be put to the test later today. he and also his son, james, will be facing uk legislators in just a few hours from now. they'll also be alongside rebekah brooks, former editor of the "news of the world." it's expected to be a harsh grilling for the three individuals over what they knew about alleged phone hacking at the london tabloid "news of the world." those allegations have done quite as much to damage rupert murdoch's reputation as they've done to "news of the world's" stock. it's been plummeting. >> the company's become the target of a hack attack itself. lulzsec is claiming a hack attack with a fake story about murdoch being found dead in his garden. in a tragic turn one of the first journalists to expose hacking at "news of the world" was found dead on monday. sean hull was former "news of the world" emp
executive rebekah brooks will face tough questioning this morning before lawmakers. just hours from now, this is the development in the growing phone hacking scandal that seems to be changing by the hour. nbc's jim maceda is live for us in london right outside parliament with all the details. jim, good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning, lynn. well, all eyes will be on a that building behind me, the parliament, and a small room inside that parliament building just big enough for about 40 or so spectators, but there will be overflow rooms with lots of television screens. this is must-see tv today for all of britain and elsewhere. as one politician here put it, the three musketeers of the murdoch media empire and that phone hacking scandal will appear later today. now, they'll be grilled by ten members of a select committee on culture, sport and media. it doesn't sound very threatening. these hearings will only last for an hour. for rupert and his son james murdoch and another hour for rebekah brooks, who was the chief executive of murdoch's british holdings until she resigned last
murdoch, james murdoch and rebekah brooks on how much they knew about these phone hacking allegations and when did they know it and why didn't they put a stop to it sooner or be more forthcoming. they told lawmakers earlier it was one rogue reporter, an isolated incident and it didn't did any further than that. we know of course that it turns out that thousands of people may have had phone mail messages hacked and lawmakers want to get to the bottom of how much each of them knew. >> the other question is this whistle-blower found dead yesterday tragically. police are looking into that. what is the latest there? >> reporter: what we know is that basically police have confirmed that a man was found dead at his apartment. that man is believed to be the whistle-blower for news of the world. he confirmed that the editor of the paper not only knew about the phone hacking but actively encouraged it from his reporters. he was the only whistle-blower to really go public and confirm that this was the case. now, what we understand from police is that he was found dead at his apartment while his
and small question. would you agree, ms. brooks, that part of the public concern here is about the closeness of the police and now politicians to "news of the world" and "news international?" >> i think that the public's concern overwhelmingly is the on the interception of voice mails is the idea that anybody could intercept the voice mails of victims of crime, and i think that is the overwhelming concern. >> but there has been a lot of concern voiced over the closeness of the police and the politicians and the "news of the world" and "news international" wouldn't you agree as a matter of fact? >> well, i have seen that "news of the world" has been singled out for that closeness so if you are going to address this and you know this more than anyone on the committee, because of your career as a journalist that it is wholly unfair in the discussing the closeness of police and politicians with the media to single out the "news of the world." >> well, it is a fact, and this has been a criticism and yet, you are on your watch as chief executive of "news international" have a triple whammy, becaus
this morning. david brooks calls out republican groups who he says decided not to seize the chance to usher in the largest cut in the size of government in american history. he also added, they do not see politics as the art of the possible. they do not believe in seizing opportunities to make steady, messy progress towards conservative goal. they believe if they can remain pure in their faith, some day their party will win a total and permanent victory over its foes. they believe they are the gods of the new dawn. consider this, rolling out a plan with $9 trillion in deficit reduction and grover norquist panned it because it closes some tax loopholes. coburn told nbc, this is a sick place. i mean, think about it. you don't want to make this deal because it's good for the country but it's bad for me? we need a bunch of spinal transplants in both parties. so what is the public stand about this? a massive messaging war, if you will, between the two parties for the last three or four week. the new nbc/"wall street journal" poll and i can tell you one thing it's pretty decisive. that's tonight
arrests. most recently, rebecca brooks, one of rupert murdoch's most trusted executives. she resigned and was arrested two days later brooks, who denies any wrongdoing, has been a power broker for over a decade in this country. >> somebody with huge charm, a lot of very political. she was very good at getting along side people. >> including david cameron. details of his visits with media heads were released over the weekend. since elected, he has met with brooks and other murdoch editors dozens of times. the prime minister has faced withering criticism for ties to andy colson, who was served as his communications chief. colson was also arrested last week. cameron is increasingly on the defensive, facing an energized opposition. >> terrible error of judgment in hiring andy colson. i really say the prime minister has to get a grip. he has to come clean and also own up to the mistakes he made. >> in a bizarre twist tonight, news that a former "news of the world" reporter and whistleblower has been found dead in his home in england. seaning, seen here -- sean, seen here on the bbc, he was
. and that's starting in half-hour. then rebekah brooks who used to run murdoch's british newspaper empire until last week will answer questions. a limited number of the public are being allowed in. people were lined up at 7:00 a.m. and the line stretched around the block trying to get a seat. the police are still also under allegation of corruption. this story has so many 10 kals, many threads of inquiry even as it involves police involvement. a news of the word reporter was found dead in his home yesterday. sean was the man who originally blew the whistle on his knowledge -- his allegation that former editor of the world andy coulson was very aware of phone hacking and encouraged it. that allegation is something coulson has denied. bill there are when the testimony from mr. murdoch and his son james get underway we'll take you to that room in london, england. jamie: we are just getting word that the fbi is searching homes of the suspected hacker group anonymous. the target said to be in their late teens to early 20s. we are told the hacking group inspired by wikileaks has defaced web sit
brooks, will face some tough questioning, appearing before lawmakers this morning, this as the developments in the growing phone hacking scandal seem to be changing by the hour. nbc's jim maceda is live for us in london outside parliment with details. jim, good morning. >> good morning, lynn. well all eyes will definitely be on a small room inside that building behind me, the mother of parliament it's called here. just big enough for 40 or so spectators, but there will be overflow rooms with television sets. this is really must-see tv today in great britain and for many other places. certainly the united states, which is why there's so much media here today as well. as one british politician put it, it's the three musketeers of the murdoch media empire and the phone-hacking scandal that will appear here later today. they'll be grilled by ten members of a select committee. it doesn't sound like much, it's the committee for culture and media. these hearings will only last an hour for rupert and his 38-year-old son, james murdoch. and another hour following that for r
. chairman rupert murdoch and former newspaper editor rebecca brooks preparing to give testimony to a particle meantry panel in the next half hour british lawmakers are expected to grill them on allegations reporters hacked into phone messages. >> rupert murdoch might be late his car was surrounded by a mob outside earlier and he had to turn back a top london police chief has been answering questions over an hour we are joined by wisdom martin with the latest on what is happening in england. >> well, this keeps growing, all eyes on particle meantry enchoir for the much antis -- enquiry for the much anticipated executives we are waiting for murdoch's son jamess in charge of news corp.'s european operations and mr. murdoch himself. rebecca brooks who resigned as editor of news international newspaper is scheduled to testify next hour. >>> a second resignation from scotland yard, followed one from sunday. they said staying on would be a distraction. >>> during the last hour the commissioner admitted to making mistakes. >> the material is repugnant, with hind site we would have -- ye
and so, too late-night comedy. >> former news corporation rebekah brooks was arrested over the weekend for illegal wiretapping and bribing police officers for information. you know, i don't think she's getting. she said, how much is it going to take to make this away? >> news of the world, the newspaper in london has been accused now of allegedly hacking in to phones, cell phones of other people. even the royal family. so, tonight, we have a little segment called scandalous phone call of the night. >> hello. >> big deal. who cares if the head of scotland yard resigns. why is scotland yard policing england anyway? call me when the head of england yard resigns nap's news. >> time for your political ticker with tim farley. listen, i want to show you a poll. as the clock ticks -- as we get closer to that deadline for the debt ceiling, a new cbs poll shows that 46% say that the debt ceiling should be raised. compared to 24% in june. 49% shouldn't compared to 69% in june. the president has asked for a deal to get done by friday. what is your sense of it? >> sense right now is that -- somethi
in britain. a former top murdoch aide rebekah brooks was arrested yesterday. the top two men resigned over questions about a former news of the world reporter and a whittle blower turned up dead. stephanie gosk is covering the story. michael wolff is author of the man who knows the news inside the secret world of rupert murdoch. to the tangled web that may be the best way to describe this hacking scandal as the parties involved, murdoch's empire, government and the police all have ties one to another. it begins with rupert murdoch, the chief of news corporation, and his son james who handles european news. on friday, les hidden resigned, he ran murdoch's dow jones and published the "wall street journal." rebekah brooks ran the tabloid news of the word and went on to run news international. she quit and was arrested yesterday. brooks' deputy at news of the world was andy colson who ran the paper when much of the hacking was going on. he resigned and became top aide for prime minister who he resigned over the hacking scandal. the prime minister is also friends with rebekah brooks and james m
, ten arrests, most recently rebecca brooks, one of murdoch's most trusted assistants. brooks who denies any wrongdoing has been a media power broker in the country for a decade. >> somebody of huge charm, a lot of -- very political. she was very good at getting alongside people. >> reporter: including david cameron, details of his visits with media heads released by the office over the weekend. since he was elected, cameron met with brooks and other editors. criticism for ties to another former editor of "news of the world" who once served as his communications chief. coalson was also arrested last week. stephanie gosk, nbc news, london. >>> doug is here now with more on the hot weather that's only going to get worse, huh? >> yeah. i think we are going to get to the 100-degree mark and the index around 105, maybe 110 and two to three days and could be a substantial heat wave coming up and make sure you're prepared to deal with the heat later on this week. outside, still on the warm side. not as hot as earlier. temperatures still up into the 90s in the day today. and if you thought today
of the world." his son james will also give evidence, and will the former boss, rebekah brooks. the scandal has already forced two a senior police officers to resign. >> he is ben yates of the are no longer, resigning just a day after his boss, sir paul stevenson. both paying the price for failing to get to grips with the hacking scandal. so said the mayor of london. >> i regret to say i have just come off the phone john yates, who tendered his resignation. >> boras johnson said both men had jumped and were not pushed. but he made it clear he had done everything he could to encourage them. >> it is a concatenation of issues and questions. it is going to make it very difficult for them to continue to do their jobs in the way they wanted. >> yates began the day determined not to resign, telling colleagues he would not submit to trial by media. he ended it explaining why he was going. >> we in the police service are truly accountable. those of us to take on the most difficult jobs clearly have to stand up and be counted when things go wrong. sadly, there continues to be a huge amount of inaccurate
of scotland yard resigned yesterday. >> rebekah brooks was released on jail. >> rupert murdoch is said to face the scandal head-on tomorrow. >> now we move to david cameron. >> is cutting short a trip today to south africa. >> order. when are they going to do the decent thing and resign? >> congress now has 15 days to pass a bill to raise the debt ceiling before the united states government goes into a catastrophic default on august 2nd. today harry reid announced the senate will meet every day until the debt ceiling is raised. yesterday, david rogers of politico discovered and reported that house speaker john boehner and eric cantor held a secret meeting with barack obama at the white house. a republican leadership aide said "the lines of communication are being kept open, but there's nothing to report in terms of an agreement or progress." tomorrow the house republicans will hold a vote on the tea party's preferred solution to deficit reduction, the cut, cap, and balance bill, a bill that would slash spending and make raising taxes even more impossible than it seems to be now. the head of th
and they will be answering questions all day long along with the ceo of -- the former ceo, rebekah brooks, of "news of the world." >>> just a short time ago, here's james murdock when he arrived at the parliament building in london. a little different than when his father arrived. his car is better known and his father's car was swarmed by members of the media as he made his way to today's proceedings. as charlie d'agata reports from london, today's testimony comes one day after the mysterious death of a key whistle-blower. >>> reporter: now it's rupert murdock himself who takes center stage in the unfolding hacking drama that has engulfed his empire. >> for critics of rupert murdock this is the best thing that could happen. this is the best case they have ever had to argue against murdock and say he has too much power. >> reporter: murdock and his son james will tell british lawmakers how much they knew about allegations their journalists tapped into voicemails and regularly paid off police. so will former british ceo rebekah brooks, who police are already investigating. the controversy has forced
of it that the "news of the world" was sacrificed in order to try and protect rebekah brooks' position at news international. but in effect rather than her being -- her departure being announced, "news of the world" was offered up as an alternative to try to deal with the whole thing. do you regret now making that decision? do you regret closing the "news of the world" to try and save rebekah brooks? in hindsight do you wish you'd accepted her resignation to start with, in order that that paper with a fine tradition could probably continue and all of the people who are now out of work could still be in work? >> i regret very much the fate of people who will not be able to find work. the two decisions were totally unrelated. absolutely and totally unrelated. >> so when you came into the u.k. and said your priority was rebekah brooks -- >> i'm not sure i did say that. i was quoted as saying that. i walked outside my flat and had about 20 microphones stuck in my mouth so i'm not sure what i said. >> so you were misquoted? >> i'm not saying that. i just don't remember. >> i'm sorry, mr. chairman.
with a man who is living and breathing this, has been for years, our project manager brooke. [applause] he is working closely with edgar lopez, who manages all of our major projects, but was here pretty much from day one. they are being supported by our city engineers and the rest of the department coming together to deliver a great project to the ratepayers of san francisco. we're so happy to be a part of this. congratulations to the puc on getting to this point, the topping off ceremony. [applause] >> as the owners, we are certainly willing to move in, but we are not building the building. representing the builders is andy of webcor. [applause] >> it is great to be here. most people do not realize this building almost did not happen. i was at a green building conference and i ran into mayor gavin newsom. he said, we are not going to build that building. we cannot afford to. i said, mayor, you cannot afford not to. this building will be an example of what all cities should build. with the energy savings that were mentioned, this building will be like no others. when the city starts to ope
of the world editor now under arrest at a pr consultant. rebecca brooks who resigned as head of rupert murdoch's newspaper on sunday after she voluntarily went in for questioning. >> the position of rebecca brooks can be simply stated she is not guilty of any criminal offence. the position of the metropolitan police is less easy to understand. >>> government remains politically tainted as well the prime minister david cameron on official business in africa again under pressure to explain why he hired former news of the world editor andy cole son as chief of communications he stepped down in january and arrested last week. >> no one has argued that the work he did in government in any way was inappropriate or bad. he worked well in government, he then left government. >> and journalist who first blew the whistle on the hacking scandal but they says the not suspicious he worked at news of the world under editor andy cole son and the communication chief arrested in the scandal. rupert murdoch and his son james as well as rebecca brooks are testifying in just over two hours. >> thank you in the me
>> next the brookings institution forum on congressional redistricting plans that are being considered around the country. u.s. house districts are redrawn every 10 years to reflect population shifts. so far redistricting plans in 15 states have been challenged in court. over the next hour and a half panelist look at redistricting plans in california, florida and texas and how communities are being affected. >> the bewitching hour has arrived. it is 10:00 a.m.. i am tom mann, senior fellow here at workings and i'm delighted to welcome all of you with us here at brookings this morning, and to our lives c-span audience to a session entitled, a status report on congressional redistricting. now, you may have noticed on the screens, who redistricting di. wondering why that is there. we understand some of you are compelled to tweet wherever you are and if you do, we want you to know that is the event hashtag. i know you are shocked that i actually said that, norm, but there it is. >> it was written down for you. [laughter] >> eye in i am the well-known tweeter. six months ago, we
on the face of it, that the news of the world was sacrificed in order to try and protect rebekah brooks' position at news international >> i advocated at the time that this was a step we should take. this was a paper and a title that had fundamentally violated the trust of its readers, and it's something that was a matter of great regret, real gravity, but under the circumstances, and with respect to the bad things that certain of the things that happened at the "american's "nee world" some years ago, it was the right choice for the paper to cease publication. it is important to note and i want to be clear with the committee on this. that the company is doing everything it can to make sure that journalists and staff at the "news of the world" who had nothing to do with any of these issues, who are completely blameless in any of these things, and many are, you know, really have done tremendous work journalistically, that we find reemployment for them anywhere we k. the company is being as generous as we can under the circumstances. the company is being as thoughtful and compassionate for
of the world" and "the sun" was a part of it. >> thank you. >> miss brooks, rupert murdoch in his evidence session said quite clearly that the responsibility for the closure of "news of the world" lay fairly and squarely with senior management of that paper, which i assume that includes you. is that the case? >> i think -- i think i may have missed that part of the evidence. i think mr. murdoch said it exactly how it was, that it was a collective decision. we all talked together. mr. murdoch was abroad at the time at a conference. we all talked together -- >> is that mr. murdoch senior? >> sorry, yes, rupert murdoch. yes. >> you wanted to say something else? >> no. sorry. >> when you were advising your staff that the paper was closing, during the private session, i think you said something like there was more to come. would you like to expand on what you meant by that? >> when i went down to the newsroom, to explain the decision, clearly and quite rightly, the journalists on the "news of the world" who very honorable journalists who have been putting out a newspaper under the scrutiny for
to the number three spot in the company. and then there is rebekah brooks, a rupert murdoch protege. she was a top executive before she resigned on friday. she was arrested a couple of days later. let's get straight to london to atika shubert. these witnesses are not under subpoena. they don't have to say a word, do they? >> no. they don't, but it's still a court and can be held in tempt of court for example. even though there is no particular oath here, there is an incredible amount of pressure on them to answer these questions. remember, particularly in the cases of james murdoch and rebekah brooks, they have told lawmakers in previous hearings the this was the end of it. it was a rogue reporter and a private investigator and that was the end of it. clearly, it was not. because it turns out that there are, in fact, thousands of phone mail messages that may have been hacked and now they are back in front of lawmakers again trying to explain why they didn't tell the full story the first time around. >> atika, we have been paying close attention to this since early this morning. you know
. >> strong words. shannon travis, thank you very much. nice to see you. "cnn newsroom" continues with brooke baldwin. >> i like your choice of wardrobe, randi kaye. thanks. look, busy, busy tuesday here. you've been watching all day long, stories breaking everywhere. just a short time ago president obama appeared before reporters saying this, that a bipartisan group of senators has come up with a plan that could pave the way for a deal on america's credit limit. folks, this could be the first bit of good news in weeks as the deadline quickly, quickly approaches. two weeks to the day. we'll get to all that have in a moment here. let's start with this. rupert murdoch and his son were supposed to be the focus of a british parliament hearing today in london but they were upstaged momentarily by an intruder who somehow managed to get very, very close to the murdochs, too close as you're about to see. watch. so no official word yet as to who exactly that guy in the plaid shirt was. we know he was shouting you greedy billionaire, but he pushed a plateful of shaving cream into rupert murdoch's face
for running the company at the time of the illegality, your son and rebekah brooks. >> when a company closes down, it is natural for people to lose their jobs. we have in this case an army that's continuing every effort to see that those people are employed in other divisions of the company, if they're not part of the small group -- well, i don't know how big the group, whatever group was involved in criminality. >> did you close it because of the criminality? >> hmm? >> did you close the paper down because of the criminality? >> yes, we felt ashamed of what had happened and felt to bring it to a close. >> people lied to you and lied to their readers? >> we had broken our trust with our readers. but it's the important point was we had broken our trust with our readers. >> are you aware that there are other forms of illicit surveillance being used by private investigators that were used by news international? >> other forms of? >> illicit surveillance, computer hacking -- >> no. >> if the evidence is produced -- >> i mean i think all news organizations have used private detectives and do so i
brooks, they sat there hour after hour, taking the questions in good humor. and that gives them credit to their benefit, that they did go through this process. ultimately, though, tonight, as rupert murdoch did say he doesn't take responsibility for what took place although he will have to be the man that sorts it out. >> are you responsible for this whole fiasco? >> no. >> who are responsible? >> the people i trusted to run it and then maybe the people they trusted. >> can you name people? >> i worked with mr. hinton for 52 years and i would trust him with my life. >> what i think is interesting in that exchange, the normal phraseology for people doing that is, i was not to blame, but i take responsibility. the buck stops here. and what we didn't get there was that phraseology or some version thereof. we also finally, wolf, we did get later on in his final statement the hacking was wrong, the payments to the police were wrong, no excuses. >> and there was an incident there at one point where an intruder just showed up with some shaving cream. tell our viewers what happened. >> the pic
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 195 (some duplicates have been removed)